Posts Tagged ‘lambs’

Of Life and Death

May 26, 2010

Beautiful Lake District

We have just returned from a wonderful relaxing (if strenuous) holiday just 50 miles away. We have been staying in our caravan parked not far from the lovely Ennerdale. We managed a great walk to the top of Whinlatter, a more gentler one in Ennerdale, and various others taking in some of England’s finest scenery. We say new life grazing in fields — lambs, foals, calves and pretty little pigs. One little piggy followed us along the country lane!

Gentle mum with her baby.


One little piggy followed us, then went all the way home!


We also saw death in its most horrid form — a small lamb that had been attacked by crows. The sight was so shocking that tears ran down my face. A gentle creature that could not possibly do harm to others. Near by another lamb limped on three legs. Hopefully we saved it the same fate as when we told the farmer of what we had seen, he said crows will attack lambs that show signs of lameness. He intended dealing with both lambs right away.
To me that little lamb stood for all helpless creatures in the world — human as well as animal life — that are brutally treated and murdered by evil forces present in man and beast. The cries of many go unheard. We can only do what we can and pray for change. The farmer told us that the lamb’s fate was just nature. That only made it seem worse. I wanted to get a gun and shoot every crow in sight! Yes, I like to think that I’m a pacifist too!
I doubt I could have done it anyway, unless I saw a crow about to strike.
It set me on a chain of thoughts about wars. Can we stand by and watch murder on a huge scale? It is easy to turn our eyes away — or is it?

Sheep may safely graze? Are they ever 'safe'?


At least I had a welcoming Email waiting for me at home. Another great review for Seduction By Design but I’ll be posting that shortly.

View from Whinlatter Forest Park

Ulverston twixt sea and fells!

April 26, 2010

The footpath to Hoad Hill


Signpost

The start of the woodland footpath


Twin lambs

Don't look at me, I didn't write on my new coat!


Beady eyed lamb with twin.

Hello, who are you?


Truly English

Ulverston, looking towards Birkrigg Common


Lambs on the Flan

Where's mum?


Ulverston Looking towards Holker across the bay

Ulverston Looking towards Holker across Morecambe Bay


Not due for the chop!

I'm growing into a beautiful lady.


Innocence

Where's mum and my twin?


Walking Around Ulverston.

A Walk on the Flan footpath and through the bluebell woods

For a pleasant little walk take the Gill footpath and follow it along until reaching Old Hall Road. Cross the road (where we once witnessed a duck, followed by her tiny ducklings, crossing over to the other side) and take the Flan footpath. Here you can witness bonny lambs, guarded by their mums, frolicking in the open fields, Surely one of the most joyful sights that tell us that spring is here. Not all the lambs are alike. Many are part black in differing degrees but all look cute and cuddly. I love the photo here where a lamb’s eyes glow, and especially the one that informs us that both infants are number 43, belonging to sheep 43. It reminded me of being in hospital with my baby tagged Baby Hobson alongside my bed with my Hobson notes hung on the end bedrail. A happy memory indeed.
From the footpath are views towards Morecambe Bay, with a distant view of the Holker estate, home of Lord Cavendish of Furness, (part of the well-known Cavendish family who own Chatsworth in Derbyshire — the home of the Duke of Devonshire).
But you don’t have to look towards distant parts to be impressed by the loveliness surrounding the walker: rich green fields and the approaching deciduous woods are peacefully refreshing,
Having reached the gate at the end of the footpath, you cross the road and enter a gate by a house. A signpost tells you that you are on a path that leads to the Hoad Hill. Soon the woods will be filled with the rich colour and scent of bluebells. At present there are large patches of wood sorrel, shiny-leaved ivy and later-flowering plants covering the ground.
We found the woods utterly delightful when, with clouds drifting, the sun began filtering through branches bearing their young green leaves still damp with morning rain. Twittering of birds and woodland aromas enhanced our vision of nature more than mere words can tell.
At the end of the path a high set of steps takes the walker over a stone wall and on to the path that leads to the Hoad Monument and beyond, with branches off to take the walker back to the main road and town.

For stories — humorous to macabre — set in Ulverston, Furness and Lakeland, with an introduction about each setting, see my book, Still Waters Run Deep, Stories of Hidden Depths. Visit Magpies Nest Publishing for samples and reviews. Can be bought from the publisher, from bookshops in the area, or ordered from anywhere in the UK. (UK post free if bought from MNP.)
For all my books — UK and USA published, visit my author web site.
See also my Writing For Joy blog — stories, articles and photographs.

Lake District National Park

April 13, 2009

sdc11040We are very privileged to live close to one of the loveliest places on earth, and it is pretty good here too! We do go away for holidays, usually to Derbyshire (Bronte country) to visit both the area and relatives. But I love the rugged coastal regions and we have to travel much further to get there.

With spring in full bloom, it takes a lot to drag me away from our garden. But we take a walk to either the local hill to get the fantastic vistas of sea and mountains, or down via a canal walk to the Morecambe Bay shore. Today we took a drive into the upper Lakes area and visited Wasdale, stopping for lunch at a pleasant place in the middle of woods. 

Sun and shadow over the rugged rock and screes dropping down to deep Waswater, Sheep and their lambs grazing peacefully, sunlight glinting on rippling streams. No hussle, no noise, no clutter, no shacks — just peaceful countryside littered with primroses and sorrel. 

 

Wasdale in spring 2009

Wasdale in spring 2009

Great Gable, in the far distance, caught in the sun as the mist is lifting. This is one of the most rugged areas of the Lake District. It contrasts with the more heavily wooded slopes of Whinlatter and similar parkland. 

See my anthology, Still Waters Run Deep, Stories of Hidden Depths,  centred mainly in the Furness peninsular and Keswick areas.  http://www.magpiesnestpublishing.co.uk for viewing samples.

For more photos of the Lake District, and others, visit:

http://www.myspace.com/gladyswrites