Posts Tagged ‘Morecambe Bay’

February 15, Another Nursing Home Visit

February 15, 2012

February 15, Another Nursing Home Visit

The weather is warmer and the sky is sunny. I visited Geoffrey again today. It must be about four weeks since my last visit but illness and weather has caused problems.

I found him in the lounge seated by a table. He appeared to be sleeping. I touched his arm and spoke his name.

He opened his eyes as I said, “Hello, Geoffrey.”

He looked at me and asked me what I wanted him to do.

And so began my efforts to get him to talk to me. But he was constantly overtaken by tiredness, and his head would go down on his arms, which he had folded on the table.

So I asked him what he had for dinner.

“Fish, I think.”

“And did you have a pudding?”

“I think so, I usually do.”

I talked about things he has spoken about before: His childhood and ordination.

After a little while his face lit up and he smiled. He looked quite youthful for an eighty-nine year old. We had a little banter about his good looks!

It did not last long but, for me, it was manner from heaven!

His head dropped down again and I thought it best to let him sleep. His body had been giving him hell again and he said he felt dirty. (Of course, he was not dirty but he’d done a great deal of scratching all over his body.) Yes, better to let him sleep and hope he had dreams of happier days.

Ulverston twixt sea and fells!

April 26, 2010

The footpath to Hoad Hill


Signpost

The start of the woodland footpath


Twin lambs

Don't look at me, I didn't write on my new coat!


Beady eyed lamb with twin.

Hello, who are you?


Truly English

Ulverston, looking towards Birkrigg Common


Lambs on the Flan

Where's mum?


Ulverston Looking towards Holker across the bay

Ulverston Looking towards Holker across Morecambe Bay


Not due for the chop!

I'm growing into a beautiful lady.


Innocence

Where's mum and my twin?


Walking Around Ulverston.

A Walk on the Flan footpath and through the bluebell woods

For a pleasant little walk take the Gill footpath and follow it along until reaching Old Hall Road. Cross the road (where we once witnessed a duck, followed by her tiny ducklings, crossing over to the other side) and take the Flan footpath. Here you can witness bonny lambs, guarded by their mums, frolicking in the open fields, Surely one of the most joyful sights that tell us that spring is here. Not all the lambs are alike. Many are part black in differing degrees but all look cute and cuddly. I love the photo here where a lamb’s eyes glow, and especially the one that informs us that both infants are number 43, belonging to sheep 43. It reminded me of being in hospital with my baby tagged Baby Hobson alongside my bed with my Hobson notes hung on the end bedrail. A happy memory indeed.
From the footpath are views towards Morecambe Bay, with a distant view of the Holker estate, home of Lord Cavendish of Furness, (part of the well-known Cavendish family who own Chatsworth in Derbyshire — the home of the Duke of Devonshire).
But you don’t have to look towards distant parts to be impressed by the loveliness surrounding the walker: rich green fields and the approaching deciduous woods are peacefully refreshing,
Having reached the gate at the end of the footpath, you cross the road and enter a gate by a house. A signpost tells you that you are on a path that leads to the Hoad Hill. Soon the woods will be filled with the rich colour and scent of bluebells. At present there are large patches of wood sorrel, shiny-leaved ivy and later-flowering plants covering the ground.
We found the woods utterly delightful when, with clouds drifting, the sun began filtering through branches bearing their young green leaves still damp with morning rain. Twittering of birds and woodland aromas enhanced our vision of nature more than mere words can tell.
At the end of the path a high set of steps takes the walker over a stone wall and on to the path that leads to the Hoad Monument and beyond, with branches off to take the walker back to the main road and town.

For stories — humorous to macabre — set in Ulverston, Furness and Lakeland, with an introduction about each setting, see my book, Still Waters Run Deep, Stories of Hidden Depths. Visit Magpies Nest Publishing for samples and reviews. Can be bought from the publisher, from bookshops in the area, or ordered from anywhere in the UK. (UK post free if bought from MNP.)
For all my books — UK and USA published, visit my author web site.
See also my Writing For Joy blog — stories, articles and photographs.